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The Catcher in the Rye

Symbolism in The Catcher In The Rye

❶He prefers isolation but longs for companionship which would explain why he wore the hat at other times and when he did not.

by J. D. Salinger

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The Catcher in the Rye
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He oscillates from one extreme to the other- trying to remain a child and trying to reach a level of maturity he is currently not capable of. Throughout the duration of the book, Holden seems to make little progress in his personal growth, although for brief periods of time it appears he is closer to adulthood than what the reader is lead to believe. At the end of the novel Holden appears to have more acceptance of the idea of growing up.

Holden now understands that growing up is inevitable and fighting it is useless. However, regardless of this new found clarity, he still obsesses about living in an uncomplicated world. It would seem that even though he has made progress, Holden still struggles with letting go of the life he wishes were possible. Whether growing up was a pleasant experience or not, we all look back on our teenagers years, be it to learn from our mistakes, or reminisce our glory days.

Salinger structured Catcher in the Rye specifically to create an overall reflective tone. The novel opening suggests that the story is in fact being retold by who the reader learns is Holden Caulfield. The significance of Holden recounting his story as one flashback is that it shows that time has passed and he no longer feels connected to the incident, indicating Holden has in fact changed since this time. There are parts of his story where the present day Holden interjects his own thoughts suggesting he has more clarity and knowledge than he did in his past.

When remembering his visit to Mr. This gives Holden depth as a character and shows he can now recognise his own faults where previously he may have been able to.

The language used by Holden is also significant because it allows the reader to depict the character more vividly.

Holden is constantly using crude phrases that would have shocked the original readers of the book. Holden Caulfield is one of the many teenagers who, in a fit of frustration lost the map to life, hence left with no choice but to run around in aimless circles. Throughout the novel it becomes clear that Holden is finding the transition between childhood and adulthood extremely difficult.

He is plagued with conflicting emotions of wanting to grow up and be a valued member of society, versus wanting to escape into his own simple and controllable world. Eventually the pressure of having to choose one over the other overwhelms Holden to the point where he is mentally unstable. Although this is an extreme exaggeration of what most normal teenagers experience, it effectively highlights the difficulties and confusion that young people face when on the brink of adulthood. The ending of the novel provides little more clarity than the beginning.

What the reader can be sure of is thus far in the history of the human race, no one has bypassed the embarrassing, confusing but occasionally fantastic experience of growing up; therefore it is logical to assume that Holden will be no exception to this rule and in time will also proceed to grow up.

Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened. Life is like a box of cheese and flower petal sometimes it's soft and sweet, sometimes it just plain stinks. Which of your works would you like to tell your friends about?

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A sustained study of the novel. Contains a helpful section on the body of critical literature on the novel. Cambridge University Press, Provides an unusual sociological reading of the novel as well as an essay that firmly places the novel in American literary history. A study of the impact of the novel on its release during a nervous period in American social history. Search The Catcher in the Rye. He finds interacting with other people confusing and overwhelming, so by alienating himself from people he does not have to face up to this.

Holden was devastated by the tragedy, which has already happened by the time we are introduced to Holden. He has essentially shut down and repeatedly mentions how important it is for him not to get too attached to people.

This highlights the fact that Holden is not comfortable in opening up to anybody, because he is afraid of making a connection and then losing that person. This goes a long way towards explaining why Holden almost seems to be sabotaging any relationship that he begins to form! This fear has such a tight grip on Holden that he continues to spiral into deep depression and loneliness to the extent that by the end of the novel he is afraid to even speak to anyone. Holden struggles with the fact that Allie died too soon at such a young age and did not choose to do so.

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The Catcher in the Rye essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger.

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The Catcher In The Rye Essay Examples. total results. The Struggles of Holden Caulfield in the Novel, The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger. words. 2 pages. A Comparison of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain and The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger. 1, words.

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One such novel to have had such an opportunity is the book published in “Catcher in the Rye” by J. D Salinger. A good catcher in the rye essay example is the symbolism that is seen throughout the book. This article focuses on symbolism in catcher in the rye. This is an essay that shows the symbolism in The Catcher in the Rye. In The Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger perfectly captures a teenage boy’s struggle with adolescence. The story is told from the perspective of Holden Caulfield, who is widely regarded as “ the original sullen teenager” (National Public Radio, ).

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New Essays on “The Catcher in the Rye.” Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, Provides an unusual sociological reading of the novel as well as an essay that firmly places the novel in American literary history. A+ Student Essay. What is the significance of Mr. Antolini’s actions in Chapter 24? Was he making a pass at Holden? Holden Caulfield’s interpretation of his .